• Coming This Week

  • Victorian Quote of the Week

    A classic--something that everybody wants to have read and nobody wants to read.
    Mark Twain

  • The Scandalous Vics

  • Want to Guest Blog With Us?

    Victorian-era authors are welcome to contact us about guest blogging opportunities by emailing Isabel at isabel@isabelroman.com

    (all victorian genres welcome, fiction and non-fiction, including Westerns)

  • Pages

  • Archives

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,518 other followers

  • Facebook

  • Meta

Tarot of Delphi, created by Janet D.H. Hinkel

Let fall the robe and reveal yourself as a Neoclassical Victorian goddess. Slide web-19into a gossamer slip, and step onto a marble veranda by the Mediterranean sea. You are in a world of mythical creatures, gods and legends in the Tarot of Delphi.

The Tarot of Delphi is a tarot deck illustrated with Neoclassical Victorian art from 1838 to 1913. This gorgeous deck places your life at the center of the story. You interpret your past and dream your future into being through fine art from the Victorian Era.

This full-color, 78-card tarot deck features paintings by over 20 Victorian artists, including John William Waterhouse, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Henrietta Rae, Lord Frederick Leighton and George Frederic Watts.web-15

The Tarot of Delphi is available for a limited time on Kickstarter. Inspired by the Victorian artworks, artisan-crafted Victorian-style jewelry of genuine gemstones and pearls – as well as a tarot bag made from authentic 1870s Victorian fabric – are available exclusively through Kickstarter.

About Janet:
Janet D.H. Hinkel was raised in western contemplative tradition. Her writing focuses on the intersection of science and spirituality, health outliers, and the unexpected. She created the Tarot of Delphi, a tarot deck that uses fine art to explore personal stories. The project combines over 20 years as a nonfiction writer and 16 years studying tarot.

Cynthia Owens and her new release Keeper of the Light

Hello again, Victorians and Victorian-era fans, and thank you for having me again today. I’m thrilled to be returning to Slip Into Something Victorian, and I’m happy to be talking about my new novel, Keeper of the Light, Book II of The Wild Geese Series.

Keeper of the Light is a very special story to me because it allowed me to combine several different elements into one book: Ireland and Irish mythology, a darkly sensual, brooding Irish hero, a story that’s close to the sea (one of my favorite places in the entire world), and best of all to this proud Canadian, a little- known but very important bit of Canadian history.

Shortly after the end of the American Civil War, the Fenian Brotherhood, a group of Irish Catholics dedicated to freeing Ireland from Britain, attempted to invade Canada.

Made up mostly of former Union soldiers, they hoped to take areas of the country, then known as British North America, hostage. The ransom? Irish freedom, of course.

Keeper of the Light was inspired by the Fenian Brotherhood’s “invasion” of Campobello Island.

Many of these “invaders” were former soldiers of the Irish Brigade who fought on both sides of the American Civil War. Their aim was to take Canada – then a British colony – hostage and force Britain to ransom the country with Irish freedom.

The raid, led by John O’Mahony, took place in April of 1866 at Campobello Island, New Brunswick. A war party of over 700 landed on the shores of Maine. The British responded with Royal Navy warships carrying over 700 British regulars. The fleet sailed to Passamaquoddy Bay, where the Fenian force was concentrated. Discouraged and out-manned, the Fenians quickly dispersed, but the attempted invasion had far-reaching effects for the fledgling country of Canada.

The attempted invasion reinforced the idea that New Brunswick would be protected by joining with the British North American colonies of Nova Scotia and the United Province of Canada to form the Dominion of Canada. The greatest impact of the raids was the increased sense of Canadian nationalism, which eventually led the provinces into a Confederation.

To this day, the Fenian raids are viewed as an important factor in creating the Canadian nation.

About Keeper of the Light

…Like the Wild Geese of Old Ireland, five boys grew to manhood despite hunger, war, and the mean streets of New York…

She was everything he despised…but he didn’t know it

Cathal Donnelly washed up on the shores of an Atlantic island one stormy night, with no memory of who he was or why he was there. But is his lovely rescuer his salvation…or his doom?

She dreamed of a very different life

Laura Bainbridge has spent her entire life on tiny Turtle Island, but she dreams of a Season in London and a presentation to Queen Victoria. Can a handsome Irish stranger with a golden tongue and a disturbing past change her heart and convince her to stay?Keeper_of_the_Light_-_test

As Cathal’s memory slowly returns, both he and Laura must come to grips with his painful past…and fight for a future free of hatred and loss.

Excerpt:

He moaned again, but made no further response. A cloud skimmed across the moon and away again, leaving her with an unimpeded view of his sleeping face. She caught her breath.

He was beautiful.

His skin was fair but for the nasty gash at his temple. A livid scrape slashed across one high cheekbone. His long black curls flopped wetly over his forehead, and Laura fought the urge to brush them back…

His brows were long, dark slashes against the pallor of his high forehead, the two vertical lines between them the only sign of his conflict. A soft moan spilled from his full lips, making her wonder what it might be like to be kissed by that oh-so-masculine mouth.

Her fascinated gaze roved over the freckles sprinkled across his long straight nose, the tiny dent in his chin that surely must deepen into a cleft when he smiled. He shifted restlessly, drawing her gaze to the broad shoulders encased in white wool, down the long body and along his well-muscled legs. His hands were large and square, calloused and bleeding. One of them clutched a canvas bag in a death grip.

“They’re coming for us.” His deep voice vibrated with raw anguish. “We’ve got to…get out of here. Now!” He tried to rise, but fell back with a helpless half-groan.

Buy Keeper of the Light

Amazon

Kindle

Barnes & Noble

Nook

Smashwords

Chapters

The Book Depository

Booksamillion

Foyle’s

Powell’s Books

About Cynthia

I believe I was destined to be interested in history. One of my distant ancestors, Thomas Aubert, reportedly sailed up the St. Lawrence River to discover Canada some 26 years before Jacques Cartier’s 1534 voyage. Another relative was a 17thCentury “King’s Girl,” one of a group of young unmarried girls sent to New France (now the province of  Quebec) as brides for the habitants (settlers) there.

My passion for reading made me long to write books like the ones I enjoyed, and I tried penning sequels to my favorite Nancy Drew mysteries. Later, fancying myself a female version of Andrew Lloyd Weber, I drafted a musical set in Paris during WWII.

A former journalist and lifelong Celtophile, I enjoyed a previous career as a reporter/editor for a small chain of community newspapers before returning to my first love, romantic fiction. My stories usually include an Irish setting, hero or heroine, and sometimes all three. I’m the author of The Claddagh Series, historical romances set in Ireland and beyond. The first three books in The Claddagh Series, In Sunshine or in Shadow, Coming Home, and Playing For Keeps, are all available from Highland Press. Deceptive Hearts and Keeper of the Light, the first two books in The Wild Geese Series, have just been released.

I am a member of the Romance Writers of America, Hearts Through History Romance Writers, and Celtic Hearts Romance Writers. A lifelong resident of Montreal, Canada, I still live there with my own Celtic hero and our two teenaged children.

Website
Facebook
Twitter

#Guest Cynthia Owens

Hi Victorians, and thank you for having me today. I’m thrilled to be returning to Slip Into Something Victorian, and I’m happy to be talking about both my new novel, Deceptive Hearts, Book I of The Wild Geese Series, and an item that plays a very important part in my story: the Derringer.

Deceptive Hearts is set in New York City in 1865, in both elegant Gramercy Park and the Five Points, where my hero, Shane MacDermott grew up – and where my heroine, Lydia Daniels, visits on a regular basis. Lydia is determined to save the girls and women there from their abusive fathers and husband, no matter the risk to herself.

“Jamie brought word of another one.”

Alex tensed. “Where?”

“Five Points. Again.” Lydia’s lips twisted. “Apparently the combination of joblessness and Guinness makes a man…difficult.”

Difficult. The age-old euphemism. Alex nodded. “What’s her name?”

“Nan Daly.” Squaring her shoulders, Lydia vowed, “I am going there first thing tomorrow.”

“Not alone!”

Lydia’s mouth set into a stubborn line. “I must Alex. You know I have to.”

“At least take Jamie with you.”

Lydia shook her head, capturing Alex’s hand in hers and giving it a quick squeeze. “You know how hard it is to win the trust of these women. Jamie will drive me, stand by me if I need him, but I must see her alone. He might intimidate her. Do not worry,” she added. “I shall be perfectly safe.” She waved a shaky hand in the direction of the little locked drawer in her night table. “I will be armed.”

The Derringer is Lydia’s weapon of choice when she ventures into the Five Points, a notorious area of New York City dominated by run-down tenements and desperate immigrants.

A Derringer was a tiny handgun frequently used by women because of its ease of concealment. It was not a repeating gun, which would add size and bulk to the weapon. The original cartridge Derringer held only a single round, and the barrel pivoted sideways on the frame to allow access to the breech for reloading. These pocket pistols were tiny enough to be carried in a woman’s reticule or stocking and proved good protection for the city’s prostitutes. Though not very powerful, the bullet’s slow speed made them more dangerous.

The most important feature of a Derringer—both for Lydia and for the woman on the street—is that, though the bullet moved slowly enough to be seen in flight, at close range it could easily kill.

Blurb:
…Like the Wild Geese of Old Ireland, five boys grew to manhood despite hunger, war, and the mean streets of New York…

He survived war, and returned to devastation

A hero of the Irish Brigade, Shane MacDermott returned home to New York to find his family decimated and his world shattered.

She risks her life to save the people she loves

Lydia Daniels will risk anything to protect the women she shelters beneath the roof of her elegant Gramercy Park mansion—even if she has to trust the one man who can destroy her.

Shane and Lydia both hide secrets that could destroy them – and put their lives in jeopardy. Can their love overcome their carefully guarded deceptive hearts?

Excerpt:
“We meet again.” Shane kept his voice quiet so as not to frighten Mary Kate any further. He let his gaze rest on her for a long silent moment. He’d learnedDeceptive_Hearts long ago that a piercing stare would make the guilty guiltier. Kieran once told him his stare could cut right though a Reb line to the plantation they were set to defend.

“So we do, Officer…?” Lydia let her sentence trail off, obviously hoping he would offer the information she sought.

Ah, no, my lovely one. Not yet.

He kept his gaze on her face. “May I ask what you are doing—here?” Satisfaction gripped him as her lashes flickered and her hands clutched the folds of her gown more tightly. “The Five Points is hardly a neighborhood for a gently-bred young woman such as yourself to be taking a stroll.”

Behind him, Mary Kate’s breath caught on a sob. But he couldn’t spare her a look. Not yet. “What business have you with this young lady, Mrs…?”

Her chin jerked up, her eyes snapping as she refused the bait. Reluctant admiration curled in the pit of his stomach. He watched in fascination as she moved to place a gentle hand on the girl’s shoulder. “It is all right, Mary Kate. I understand why you feel you cannot leave your father.” To Shane, she said defensively, “I offered Mary Kate a position in my household, officer. I thought it might improve her circumstances.”

Buy Links:
Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Smashwords

The Book Depository

Books-A-Million

 About Cynthia:
I believe I was destined to be interested in history. One of my distant ancestors, Thomas Aubert, reportedly sailed up the St. Lawrence River to discover Canada some 26 years before Jacques Cartier’s 1534 voyage. Another relative was a 17thCentury “King’s Girl,” one of a group of young unmarried girls sent to New France (now the province of  Quebec) as brides for the habitants (settlers) there.

My passion for reading made me long to write books like the ones I enjoyed, and I tried penning sequels to my favorite Nancy Drew mysteries. Later, fancying myself a female version of Andrew Lloyd Weber, I drafted a musical set in Paris during WWII.

A former journalist and lifelong Celtophile, I enjoyed a previous career as a reporter/editor for a small chain of community newspapers before returning to my first love, romantic fiction. My stories usually include an Irish setting, hero or heroine, and sometimes all three. I’m the author of The Claddagh Series, historical romances set in Ireland and beyond. The first three books in The Claddagh Series, In Sunshine or in Shadow, Coming Home, and Playing For Keeps, are all available from Highland Press.Deceptive Hearts, the first book in The Wild Geese Series, has just been released, and Book II, Keeper of the Light, will soon be released from Highland Press.

I am a member of the Romance Writers of America, Hearts Through History Romance Writers, and Celtic Hearts Romance Writers. A lifelong resident of Montreal, Canada, I still live there with my own Celtic hero and our two teenaged children.

Where to find Cynthia:

Website
Facebook
Twitter

 

Victorian Crime

I had started out by reading an article on North Korea but BBC has a sidebar and there it had this interesting link to Victorian Crime. This is how it starts out, a catchy enough intro to make anyone want to read:

The sensational murder stories in the Victorian era sold newspapers and crime fiction in a way that had never been seen before, stories which continue to fascinate us today.

Yup. The crime genre could (arguably) have started with the Victorians. Lots of things began then, actually, and there’s this cool video I so want to watch on the hidden dangers of the Victorian house but I’m not in the UK so the site won’t let me. I’m very upset about that, but will let it go.

So this crime genre:_65955962_464_british_lib_newgate_c00953-02

For the first time, mass-market newspapers were being created such as The Illustrated Police News which specialised in reporting on crime and criminals, using language and pictures that were far more lurid than that used in modern tabloids.

(Picture is theirs from this artcile.)

“The prototype of the all-knowing detective is a form we still recognise today. We still use the same storytelling formulas that were built in the 19th Century,” adds Flanders.

Guest: Patty Henderson

Today the Scandalous Vics would like to welcome Patty Henderson. Patty writes Gothic Victorian romances with a twist: the intrepid heroine is a lesbian. Please welcome Patty as she talks about her newest release, Passion for Vengeance.

About Patty:

After writing four books in the Brenda Strange Supernatural Mysteries series and one vampire book, I have Imagefound a genre that I absolutely and thoroughly enjoy. As a history buff, I can finally immerse myself completely in the fantasy world of dark, brooding castles and mansions, walking hallways by the light of a single candle, and spinning tales of lovely women stumbling across deadly secrets and meeting and falling in love with mysterious mistresses of decaying estates. What fun.

I hope you can come and discover my Gothic Historical Romances and share some of the fun I have writing them. All three of my Gothic Romances are available in paperback via Amazon.com and in eBook at Amazon.com and ePub versions at Barnes and Noble.com. And aside from my writing, I am also a graphics professional and book cover creator. If any of you who are self-published are in need of a book cover, I offer the best rates in the market for a complete trade paperback cover or eBook cover. I’ve provided the link to my graphics web site, Boulevard Photografica.

I want to take the time to thank Isabel (Patty, you’re always welcome!) for letting me escape my dark castle and come here to Slip Into Something Victorian and talk about my books. I’ve included some links below. Come and say hello at my Facebook page, my web site or Twitter.

LINKS:

Facebook

Twitter

Author Website

Book Covers

Gothic Romances. Some of us remember those paperback racks in the late 1960s and 1970s filled with Gothic Romances, all of them resplendent with covers mostly featuring a heroine running from a menacing castle or decaying mansion. The plots were truly romances, some set in current times while others were historicals set in Victorian times. All of them contained a dashing, mostly brooding dark hero, sometimes coming across as an unsavory character only to be revealed as the knight in shining armor, and our intrepid heroine. Gothic Romances were always filled with a sense of foreboding and dripped with atmosphere and suspense. But they always remained true to the romance.

I write Gothic Historical Romance, mainly set in the Victorian years, but with a big….big difference. The dark, dashing hero is a heroine. Girl meets and gets girl. I keep all the trappings of the traditional Gothic Historical Romance, but the romance is between two women. I write in the lesbian fiction niche. A very small, but vibrant and thriving niche. The readers are voracious and demand quality fiction from the authors who write lesbian fiction.

I’ve written and published three Gothic Historical Romances, The Secret of Lighthouse Pointe, Castle of Dark Shadows, and my very latest, Passion for Vengeance. The latest Gothic tackles a darker and deeper subject matter and was the hardest of the three romances to write. All three come to happy and satisfactory endings for the reader and for the characters, but in Passion for Vengeance, the path is more painful and more fragile. I had to pull some of my own and deeply buried personal issues of loss of faith, strength in faith, salvation and forgiveness. The problems of seeing only gray and white, good and bad, is also a topic I deal with all these in Passion for Vengeance.

Some of my Gothic Historical Romances have crossed into mainstream Romance readers, gaining sales and reviews from mainstream readers and not only lesbian readers. While I recognize that reading a sexy Romance with two women instead of the hero and heroine may not be everyone’s cup of tea, some are enjoying my Gothic Romances and for that, I am delighted, and hope many more might give them a try.

Here is the blurb for my newest Gothic Historical Romance, Passion for Vengeance:

It’s been a long time since Jane Havens, Mistress of Havenswood, felt the joy and promise of by-gone days when her family home, Havenswood, was a thriving and powerfulImage farming estate. Together with her elder brother Cole, who drowns his sorrow in alcohol, Jane does what she can to lead the fading estate through the hard times that fell upon the family after their father, a Union Army Colonel, died shortly after the Civil War.

    Jane and Cole try to raise their little brother, Henry, a wild young boy with no direction, no manners and no one to marshal his considerable natural abilities into a productive, young gentleman. But when his new governess, Emma Stiles, arrives, the whole household goes into shock as Henry shapes up, Cole doubles down on the amount of drink he consumes to drown his failures, and Jane Havens falls madly in love with her little brother’s governess. Then the trouble begins.

    Accidents begin to happen to the residents of Havenswood—incidents that increase in seriousness and danger. Some within the household point fingers at Emma Stiles. Jane will not believe her new lover has anything to do with the terrifying accidents until a chance visit by a new doctor in town raises the specter that Emma Stiles may not be quite who she seems. As the reality of Emma’s tortured soul descends upon Havenswood and Jane, it is clear that the demons of vengeance can only be saved by love and forgiveness. Or is it too late for forgiveness and too late for love?

    Set in the tumultuous decade after the Civil War, Passion for Vengeance is a Gothic Romance tale of betrayal, revenge, love and forgiveness.

 Where to buy Passion for Vengeance:

Amazon
Barnes and Noble

Monday Quote: Train Robbery

July 21, 1873: In Adair, Iowa, Jesse James and the James-Younger Gang pull off the first successful train robbery in the American Old West, netting a total of $3,000 (US) from the Rock Island Express.

Don’t be alarmed Miss Cullen, I’m just a young bandit trying to get along. ~Tom Gordon, The Great Train Robbery

Quote of the day: Physicians and Women’s Rights

July 16, 1880 Emily Stowe becomes the first female physician licensed to practice medicine in Canada.

How many quotes could I use on doctors, evil, money, etc? I decided on this one. Just to be different.

People pay the doctor for his trouble; for his kindness they still remain in his debt.  ~Seneca

%d bloggers like this: