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This is old Red in Dallas

Lizzie Borden House!

The guest room, where Abby died, between the bed and the mirror.

The guest room, where Abby died, between the bed and the mirror.

 

Entrance way to the house.  The door leads to the sitting room, where Andrew died on the sofa

Entrance way to the house. The door leads to the sitting room, where Andrew died on the sofa

 

Lizzie's room.  That's the doorway, there, between Lizzie's room and her parents.

Lizzie's room. That's the doorway, there, between Lizzie's room and her parents.

 

 

Dining room--Bridget had just cleaned these windows before the murder of Andrew.  It's believed that Abby was already dead.

Dining room--Bridget had just cleaned these windows before the murder of Andrew. It's believed that Abby was already dead.

  

Front Parlor

Front Parlor

Victorian homes were often divided into the Front Parlor where guests were entertained, and the Back Parlor, which the family used.  In the case of this house it was the Parlor and The Sitting Room (Andrew died in the sitting room).   It was late in the Victorian era, when funeral homes were common, that the Parlor became the Living Room (since the dead were no longer laid out in it).  In the case of the Bordens funeral, Abby and Andrew were laid out in the dining room (at least according to a newspaper at the time).
the sitting room, where Mr. Borden died--a view from the sofa

the sitting room, where Mr. Borden died--a view from the sofa

 

Denise on the front staircase (not at my best--no makeup!)

Denise on the front staircase (not at my best--no makeup!)

The Borden house has 2 stair cases, one in the front leading to the guest bedroom, Lizzie’s room, and through Lizzie’s room to Emma’s.   As I’ve said, the door between Lizzie’s and her parents’ room was locked and blocked by Lizzie’s bed.  There was, therefore, no access to that half of the upstairs from this stair case, or vica versa.

view of guest room from the middle of the stair case

view of guest room from the middle of the stair case

On the day of the murder, when Andrew came home, the door was bolted from the inside.  Andrew had to be let in by Bridget (his key wasn’t good enough).  This is what the maid said, and that she heard Lizzie “laugh” from the top of the stair case.  Lizzie denied it, saying she was in the kitchen.   If, however, Bridget were correct, it’s eerily possible that she was laughing not only because her father couldn’t get in–but because she could see through the rails, under the bed, to where her stepmother lay dead in a pool of blood.  

 

 train-depot-website1Old Train Depot, Deadwood, South Dakota

 

 

 

Stockade Gate

Stockade Gate

Andersonville Prison, Historical Site, Georgia 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dead Line

Dead Line

Andersonville Confederate Prison, Georgia.  When a prisoner crossed the dead line, he was shot dead.  This is where the term deadline, which we now use in a much less lethal manner, originated.

 

 

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6 Comments

  1. Marlene says:

    I LOVE the red background. It’s perfect, actually, not obtrusive and I can see it on the wall of an old Victorian house, can’t you?

    Thanks for all your talent, time and creativity.

    Hugs,
    Auntie Marlene

  2. deeagan says:

    Thanks Aunt Marlene! I only wish it were a tad redder. Nope, I am never happy!

    Yes, the old Victorian home was the feel I was going for. I think it would do well, too, in all homes–it has a Western feel as well as Eastern, doesn’t it?

    I wish I could do something with the background color of the body.

  3. […] You can read the post here. If you have trouble finding the picture gallery, click here. […]

  4. Great photos, Dee! I especially love the front parlor pic with the tabletop Christmas tree.

  5. Mary Ann says:

    I love the pictures of Andersonville! I love anything connected with the Civil War. It is very interesting to learn of the origin of the term “deadline” Thanks a lot.

  6. Caroline Clemmons says:

    This post is filled with so much we can use in our writing! I would love to have toured the home. I’m not sure I could tour the prison site. All the old emotions would rush at me. See me shudder? The photo of the old Dallas Court House is the best one I’ve seen. Pollution has dulled the color, but it’s still an impressive building. Great post.

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