Victorian Slang of the Week–cheek

Volume 1, A-G, J.E.Lighter Editor
Volume 1, A-G, J.E.Lighter Editor
cheek: I usually think of this as a British term, but I am wrong. It was used in the U.S as well. 1) As a verb, 1871, to address someone with insolence. 2)a verb, to cheek it out, or cheek through something–to overcome adversity with impudence or audacity. 1851, with a few references. “I didn’t have the qualifications for the job, but I cheeked it out and was hired.”

Also the subsequent “cheeky” used from 1857–audacious, impudent.

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