Victorian Slang of the Week

Badger—a panel thief—1858.  I had no idea what this was until I read this definition. Apparently a man hid behind a panel in a room, while a woman (prostitute?) entices the man into bed. The man behind the panel—the “badger”—comes out and steals the man’s money.  This is referred to as the “badger game”  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Badger_game

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3 thoughts on “Victorian Slang of the Week”

  1. I heard of this on a contemporary TV show. The difference today being that the “badger” takes a compromising photo and uses it to blackmail the man. Of course, this only works if the man involved with the prostitute/other woman is someone with a. money and b. someone who wants to shield himself from exposure. No pun intended. LOL It might also explain why my dad used tell us kids there was no point in “badgering” him for money. Slightly different context, but we knew he meant there was no money available for us.

    Caroline Clemmons

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